Friday, June 3, 2016

Single, Double, Treble Crochet and You

Pop quiz: What do single, double, half-double, and treble crochet stitches have in common?

Basically everything, actually.

If you know how to wrap a piece of yarn around a the hook and pull it through a loop - literally those two actions - then congrats! You already know how to do all of these stitches!

No really, I'm not joking.

The action of doing a single crochet is defined as such:

Insert hook into the stitch (or "V"), yarn over (loop yarn around the hook), and draw the yarn through the stitch/"V" you just inserted it into. At this point, you should have two loops on your hook. Yarn over once again and draw the yarn through the two loops on the hook.

When you break it down like that, it sounds like a lot, but that's how everything is. If you broke down the meticulous details of how to sharpen a pencil (pick up the pencil, put one foot in front of the other in the direction of the pencil-sharpener, raise pencil, insert the pencil into the hole on the left of the sharpener, and so on and so forth), it can also sound time-consuming and difficult. But is it? Not really, no.

So here is the SC in action:


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I know I went a little fast - I apologize.


Single Crochet 

The breakdown: Insert your hook into the stitch/"V", yarn over, and bring the hook and yarn back through the stitch you just came through. This will create two loops on your hook. Do NOT bring it through the stitch and the one loop already on your hook unless you mean to "Slip Stitch" instead of "Single Crochet."

 The visual:
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Now that you have two loops on your hook, yarn over again and bring the yarn through the two loops. You are done! That is a Single Crochet!
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Okay, I'm going to show you the whole process again from beginning to end and a little bit slower than before. Also, pay attention to my right thumb - I am pointing out the "V" so you know where exactly you are to insert from the stitch below. This is for a normal Single Crochet.
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Are you ready to step it up a notch? Let's learn Double Crochet and Treble Crochet. The only difference between Single, Double, and Treble is that you do the whole action of the Single Crochet... a single time. For a Double Crochet, you do it twice. Treble, eh you get it.

Double Crochet

The breakdown: Double Crochet - you yarn over once before you insert your hook into the stitch/"V" below. Insert your hook, and bring it through the stitch. Yarn over again and bring it through the first two loops on the hook (the loops closest to the hook). Yarn over once again and draw through the remaining loops.

The visual: Yarn over once before you insert your hook, insert the hook, yarn over and bring yarn through the stitch/"V." This creates three loops on your hook.
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Yarn over and bring the yarn through the first two loops only.
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Yarn over again and draw through the last two hoops.
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Treble Crochet 

The breakdown: Treble Crochet - you yarn over twice before you insert your hook into the stitch/"V" below. Insert your hook and bring it through the stitch. Yarn over again and bring it through the first two loops on the hook (the loop closest to your hook). Yarn over again and draw through the two loops closest to the hook. Yarn over a final time and draw through the remaining loops. Repetitive, eh? 

The visual: Yarn over twice before you insert your hook
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Insert the hook and bring the yarn through
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Yarn over, bring the yarn through the first two loops Yarn over, bring the yarn through then next two loops Yarn over a final time and bring the yarn through the final two loops
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Okay, now we're really going to spice it up.

The Half Double.
Scared?

The breakdown: Yarn over once before inserting your hook like you would a normal Double Crochet. Bring the yarn through the stitch/"V." Yarn over and bring through all three loops on the hook.

Wait what?

Yup. That's it.

Sorry for the disappointment. =/

The visual: Yarn over once, insert your hook, and bring the yarn through to create the three loops.
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Yarn over again and draw through all three loops.
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Boom.    




Now what do these stitches look like once complete? Here is an example of Treble, Double, Half Double, and Single Crochet all in a line:



Here I have the same picture but with notations:




And that's all there is to them!

Just a reminder, these are US terms. Here are how they are most often abbreviated in patterns:

Single Crochet - sc
Double Crochet - dc
Half Double Crochet - hdc
Treble Crochet - tc

I hope this tutorial was clear! Please let me know if you have any questions!

Happy Crocheting!



4 comments:

  1. Is there also a quadruple crochet? How about a half-treble?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Apparently yes to the quadruple! It is, essentially, the same process as the Treble and Double - however many you want to make, you yarnover that many times before inserting the hook. Each time, you yarn over and draw through two loops until you are back to only one loop on the hook. These are less-functional as stitches when left alone as they are very loose and holy. When combined with other stitches, however, they create a neat texture. For instance, a pattern where you single crochet a whole row and the next row you treble crochet, single crochet in repetition, it creates a bobble-effect. I often make scrubby washcloths with this pattern.

      But as a short answer, there are definitely more stitches.

      Double Treble (Dtr), Triple Treble (Trtr), Quadruple Treble, Quituple Treble, and on and on and on.

      Delete
  2. I saw examples - they look like something one would only use for making special projects like coral reefs, geometricals, or creepy-crawly critters.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I saw examples - they look like something one would only use for making special projects like coral reefs, geometricals, or creepy-crawly critters.

    ReplyDelete